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Bluetick Coonhound

Bluetick Coonhound
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Bluetick Coonhound Breeders & Puppies For Sale If your a Bluetick Coonhound breeder and have Bluetick Coonhound puppies for sale, send us your details for free and we will add to our Bluetick Coonhound Breeders page.

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Origin / History The Bluetick Coonhound originated in Tennessee, United States. This breed has been developed by crossing the English Foxhound, American Foxhound, the Black and Tan Virginia Foxhound, the Bleu Gascogne French hound, and the cur dog. Selective breeding of Bluetick Coonhounds took place in Louisiana. Bluetick Coonhounds were originally classified as English Coonhounds, but Bluetick breeders didn't want to follow the trend of producing hot-nosed, faster hunting dogs. They wanted to keep breeding Blueticks as cold-nosed and resolute dogs, even if they were a little slower. They then separated themselves from the English breeders in 1945, named their own breed, and kept their own hunting style.

This breed is recognised by the National Kennel Council, the New Zealand Kennel Club and the Australian Kennel Club. Breeders of these dogs are also seeking recognition from the American Kennel Club.

Appearance Bluetick Coonhounds are muscular, but they are not chunky or clumsily built. Their hind legs are muscular and long. These dogs have compact feet with well-arched toes. They have low-set ears and a square muzzle. Their skull is slightly domed, and their flews and lips cover their lower jaw. Dogs of this breed have good eyesight, which allows them to work well in dark areas or during nighttime. The eyes of these dogs are large, set wide apart, and are light to dark brown in colour. The coat of these dogs is short-haired, thick, and moderately coarse.

Colours Dogs of this breed have a tricolour coat that sports a speckled blue look. The heavy ticking found on the coat is actually composed of black hairs on a white background. This combination creates a bluing effect. These dogs should have tan dots on their cheeks and above their eyes, as well as dark red ticking on their feet, lower legs, chest and below the tail. The blue ticking on the body should be predominant over the colour white.

Temperament Bluetick Coonhounds are highly intelligent dogs that are loyal to their family. They make good companion dogs and get along well with older children as well as younger ones. These dogs are very attentive, alert, and are able to work on harsh terrain even during difficult weather conditions. Although they are fearless and warrior-like when hunting, these dogs make good companions.

Height and Weight Dogs of this breed have a height that ranges from 20 to 27 inches and a weight that falls between 45 and 80 pounds.

Common Health Problems Bluetick Coonhounds have no known genetic health issues. Owners should, however, check the ears of these dogs regularly for infections.

Living Conditions These dogs are not suitable for apartment dwellers. It's important for Bluetick Coonhounds to be given at least a large yard where they can run around. Owners should also make sure that they do not let these dogs run free unless they are in a safe, secure area.

Exercise Requirements Dogs of this breed need vigorous exercise, so owners must take their Bluetick Coonhounds out for long, brisk walks daily. If not given enough exercise, these dogs may become destructive and high-strung. These dogs are natural hunters, so it's important to keep them in a fenced-in area if they're being allowed to exercise on their own. If left alone in an unsecured area, these dogs may run off and follow interesting scents for hours.

Training Requirements These dogs can be quite challenging to train, so this breed is best for experienced owners. Owners of these dogs need to train these dogs using firm and consistent methods. If not trained properly, these dogs can become aggressive. These dogs should also be socialized well at a young age.

Life Expectancy Bluetick Coonhounds live for around 11 to 12 years.

Grooming The short-haired coat of the Bluetick Coonhound is easy to groom and care for. Owners just need to brush the coat of their dog occasionally to eliminate loose and dead hairs. The ears of these dogs should also be checked regularly and cleaned frequently to prevent infection.

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More Bluetick Coonhound Information: Check out our Bluetick Coonhound Clubs and links to more informative websites dedicated to the breed.

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