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Beagle Harrier

Beagle Harrier
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Beagle Harrier Breeders & Puppies For Sale If your a Beagle Harrier breeder and have Beagle Harrier puppies for sale, send us your details for free and we will add to our Beagle Harrier Breeders page.

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Origin / History The Beagle Harrier was developed by Baron Gérard in France during the late nineteenth century. There are two theories regarding the development of this breed. One is that the Beagle Harrier is a cross between the breeds Beagle and Harrier, and the other one states that the Beagle Harrier is not a cross of the Beagle and the Harrier but rather the link between the two breeds.

Beagle Harriers are rare dogs that are excellent in small game hunting. They are great for hunting deer, hares, foxes and wild boars. In 1974, the standard for the Beagle Harrier was officially registered with the Fédération Cynologique Internationale. Although this breed is rarely seen outside of France, it is gaining popularity in its hometown.

Appearance Beagle Harriers look just like the Beagle and Harrier, having the same bone and structure, as well as the long ears, attitude, and expression that are common to the two breeds. When inspected closely, though, one would see that the Beagle Harrier is too large to be a Beagle and too small to be a Harrier. The Beagle Harrier looks just like a typical small foxhound, and its size is halfway between that of the Beagle (which is smaller) and the Harrier (which is larger). Dogs of this breed have a rather broad skull, and a muzzle that is almost equal in length to the skull. These dogs have a straight nasal bridge, and their lips cover their lower jaw. They have a complete set of white teeth that are evenly spaced and meet in a scissors bite. Beagle Harriers have a black nose and dark eyes. The short ears of these dogs are set at eye level and lie flat against their skull. Their back is short, muscular, and firm, and their ribs are moderately arched. The forelegs of these dogs are straight, strong, and parallel, while their hind legs are muscular and fleshy. These dogs have a smooth and thick coat.

Colours Dogs of this breed are usually tricoloured (fawn, black, and white). They can also have markings that are from pale to deep tan in colour.

Temperament These dogs are very friendly, even-tempered, and calm. They make loyal pets and good companions. Beagle Harriers usually get along well with children as well as other pets. Being a hunting breed, though, these dogs may take off after an interesting scent.

Height and Weight These dogs have a height that ranges between 15 and 20 inches, and their weight runs from 30 to 50 pounds.

Common Health Problems Beagle Harriers are generally healthy and don't have any genetic health issues. They may, however, be susceptible to getting afflicted with hip dysplasia.

Living Conditions Dogs of this breed should be provided with at least a large yard where they can get plenty of exercise. It's also important for these dogs to live with owners who can provide them with much attention.

Exercise Requirements These dogs should be taken out on long walks daily. As hunting dogs, Beagle Harriers may take off after an interesting scent, so owners should keep them on a leash when walking them in an unsecured area. Beagle Harriers should also be allowed to run around in a large, secure area.

Training Requirements The Beagle Harrier can be quite challenging to train because its keen sense of smell may distract it from the activity. Owners should make their training sessions brief and fun for the dogs.

Life Expectancy Beagle Harriers usually live for approximately 12 to 13 years.

Grooming The coat of these dogs are easy to groom and care for. Their coat should be brushed regularly to remove dead hairs. Bathing should be done only when necessary because frequent bathing may strip natural oils off the coat of these dogs.

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More Beagle Harrier Information: Check out our Beagle Harrier Clubs and links to more informative websites dedicated to the breed.

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