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Smooth Fox Terrier

Balack & White Smooth Fox Terrier
The Smooth Fox Terrier is UK & USA Champion Ttarb The Brat, a very famous dog of it's breed. He is Black & White (They can also be Tan & White) and has a short smooth coat.
Photo with thanks to Yvonne Murgatroyd

Smooth Fox Terrier Breeders & Puppies For Sale If your a Smooth Fox Terrier breeder and have Smooth Fox Terrier puppies for sale, send us your details for free and we will add to our Smooth Fox Terrier Breeders page.

Smooth Fox Terrier Rescue Center Visit the Smooth Fox Terrier rescue centers if your looking to rescue a Smooth Fox Terrier , as well as learn more about the breed or just support the rescue centers for there hard work.


Group Terriers (KC)

Origin / History The Smooth Fox Terrier is the older of the two breeds of fox terrier, the other being the Wire Fox Terrier. Both were long believed to come from the same ancestor, but tests have proven that they come from completely different lines. While the wire-haired variety has been traced to the Welsh rough black and tan, the Smooth Fox Terrier is most likely descended from the Smooth Black and Tan, with some Bull Terrier and Beagle blood in the mix.

As their name suggests, fox terriers were originally bred to hunt foxes and other small to medium game. In the 18th century, they worked alongside foxhounds in a sport called fox bolting, which involved scaring the foxes out of their holes and bolting after them. They also worked occasionally as rat-hunters. The American Kennel Club officially recognized them in 1885; the smooth variety was declared a distinct breed exactly 100 years later.

Appearance The Smooth Fox Terrier has a medium but powerful build, with a short, dense coat that gives it a smooth, elegant look. The head is narrow and somewhat tapered, ending in a strong muscular jaw. The eyes are dark and deep-set, and the ears folded forward to create a prominent V-shaped flap. The tail is usually docked and carried erect, sometimes with a slight curve.

Colours The coat should be predominantly white with brown or black markings. Red, liver, and brindle spots are considered undesirable.

Temperament Smooth Fox Terriers are an energetic and playful breed. They are very affectionate with their families, but they are also jealous and are not afraid to show it. These dogs crave attention; leave them alone for a few hours and they’ll get restless and hyperactive. Puppies tend to be overly curious—they’ll crawl into every nook and cranny in search of something to play with.

Height and Weight Male adults typically stand 15 ½ inches; females can be slightly smaller. Ideal weights are 15 to 20 pounds for males and 13 to 18 pounds for females.

Common Health Problems There is a high incidence of deafness in white dogs, although this is being corrected by breeders. Cataracts, lens luxation (dislocated lens), and post-nasal drip are also relatively common. Owners should also check for bone disorders such as shoulder dislocation, hip dysplasia, and Legg-Perthes disease (a bone-eating disorder).

Living Conditions Smooth Fox Terriers are fairly active indoors, so they don’t need a yard to get their fill of play. However, like most dogs, they love the outdoors and should be taken out regularly. Owners living in apartments should make sure they have enough space to romp and stretch inside. Yards should be well-fenced as these dogs can easily get lost running after prey. They can withstand most temperatures, but they prefer cold climates and should be kept cool in the summer.

Exercise Requirements These dogs need moderate exercise. Daily walks or runs are encouraged, as well as lots of play in large outdoor areas. They don’t tire easily and make great jogging companions. They’ll also be happy to run alongside bicycles, play catch, or simply run off the leash in a yard.

Training Requirements Training shouldn’t be too difficult if started early. This breed has strong hunting instincts that should be curbed at a young age; otherwise they’ll get very combative against cats and other non-canine animals. Gentle but firm training usually works best. They should also be socialized early to prevent possible aggression or excessive shyness.

Life Expectancy This is a fairly long-lived breed; a healthy dog should live 15 years or more.

Grooming Smooth Fox Terriers don’t need much grooming aside from weekly brushing and the occasional bath or dry shampoo. A firm bristle brush will work best for their short, thick coats. They are average shedders and should be groomed more often during shedding season.

Famous Examples

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